Sub:Culture Presents: The Hive Podcast

Stoop Communion w/ Jazzy, Tamice & Barnabas

January 13, 2021 Sub:Culture Inc.
Sub:Culture Presents: The Hive Podcast
Stoop Communion w/ Jazzy, Tamice & Barnabas
Chapters
Sub:Culture Presents: The Hive Podcast
Stoop Communion w/ Jazzy, Tamice & Barnabas
Jan 13, 2021
Sub:Culture Inc.

Welcome to the first new segment of 2021! This is Stoop Communion with Jazzy, Tamice, and Barnabas. In this episode, they talk about the naming of the segment as well as what it means to be a place for important, holy, and sacred conversations. Look out for Stoop Communion every second Wednesday of the month. 

If you'd like to support The Hive Podcast, you can go to our Patreon: patreon.com/subcultureinc
There you will find extra content from the Hive team as well as access to our exclusive Slack community where patrons can engage with each other and ask questions for Q&A episodes. 

Thanks for listening! 

Show Notes Transcript

Welcome to the first new segment of 2021! This is Stoop Communion with Jazzy, Tamice, and Barnabas. In this episode, they talk about the naming of the segment as well as what it means to be a place for important, holy, and sacred conversations. Look out for Stoop Communion every second Wednesday of the month. 

If you'd like to support The Hive Podcast, you can go to our Patreon: patreon.com/subcultureinc
There you will find extra content from the Hive team as well as access to our exclusive Slack community where patrons can engage with each other and ask questions for Q&A episodes. 

Thanks for listening! 

Tamice:

Hey everybody, welcome back to a new season on the hive. This is to me, the founder and CEO of subculture Inc. The Hive is designed to create a diverse set of voices opinions, theological probings, related to Scripture related to politics related to the entertainment and just the culture at large. What I wanted to do was invite you into a new segment on the hive. It's called stoop communion. And I wanted to hop on here and give you a little bit of the story and history behind the naming of our new segment. The segment is going to feature myself and my dear friends Barnabas, Lin and jazzy Johnson. And I wanted to invite you into the process of naming this particular segment. When you name something, especially within indigenous communities, the process is is not easy, and the process takes time and thought. And as listeners, we really care about you and want those who listened to the hive, to be nurtured, and to be spurred on, in their own flourishing, to be challenged theologically, to be comforted just in the buisiness, and the craziness of life. And so what we're going to do is let you hear a little bit of that naming process and ceremony. And then we'll jump into our very first episode of stupid communion the newest segment on

Jazzy:

but don't even fully know why they're tired. Yes. Right. Absolutely. The idea that the phrase that has been in, you know, my mind a lot is that I've heard staff say is spiritual homelessness. Yeah. Like a lot of people feel homeless,

Barnabus:

with nowhere to go, but they know that they can't be where they were. But they have a desire for like, longing, or, yeah, the idea of home is in my mind as you're talking. So that's an idea. Um, I think when I hear the home piece, I do think I do think, very profitable son. Mm hmm. And most particularly how the like, the shame that can be around, yes, the searching.

Jazzy:

And so then when I think about the language of home, I'm like, Oh, is this a space, where we're saying, like, no matter how far you've gone, or the questions that you're asking, there's always a place to return to or there's a hole to come through that we're finding together. About, I still don't know what to call it necessarily. I don't like finding home. I like the concept of home. But I don't know where I would land on.

Unknown:

Mm hmm.

Tamice:

Yeah, I like the concept. Yeah, I like that. I like the I like that as a concept. The image that I have right now is like, you know, the father rises up to meet him. And like, what what I envisioned that we will be creating is the like atmosphere for that. A visual of like, this is what we're setting up for, for those who are coming home. And so the father is like, outside and waiting. Something like a porch or like, I like the conference on the porch actually, or stupid. I really liked the concept of porch if we can figure out some way of like, I've actually thought about stoops a lot because of Chicago in the past and thought about like the idea of super communion. I'd like to use that language before to describe of like, wow, feeling like experiencing I like that restoration and being fed so deeply by the people. Like stupid. I don't know. I haven't heard you talk about it Jazzy, but I really like the stoop communion. I like the idea that it's in a place between here and there, you know, Yes, you.

Jazzy:

This is the place where life and like happens, where we intimate with one another.

Tamice:

And so there you have it. That was the way we named our new segment. And so without further ado, we hope you enjoy stoop community.

Unknown:

If you can't wait and be having a place where you can feel comfortable code are you saying? Are you in trouble?

Jazzy:

Yeah, and especially because it's like you is also shed on the streets. Right? But there's still

Unknown:

right? Yes.

Jazzy:

But is the in between? Because also, I do think for some people, it's like, this is a stop actually, we're not the people who welcoming and we're, we're more on the journey with you in between Yes. As you like seek to find home. are

Tamice:

because of something that's happened at home. And like, the important conversations that happen in that space between you know, so I love it, I love it. I think we, you know, people who are weathered and tired from whatever they did outside of the neighborhood, or like away, and I see people like walking towards, like this group of diverse individuals who have something in common, even if it's just like watching people doubledutch or like, watching people play in the fire hydrant, or, you know, shooting the breeze or snapping on each other. And there's so much like, I guess it's like an unintentional type of community, like no one is there saying, like, we're going to do some community at two o'clock on the stoop, right? Like, it just it just happens. It's organic mom,

Jazzy:

but it is such a safe, like, holy place to know. I mean, I really like that. I love that there's no agenda, right? Yeah, I do feel like it's also like, it's a space that's uniquely like the going to the no agenda piece. It's like we plant like, as someone who does programming, like we do all this work to try to plan how to put people together like in rooms. But somehow, sometimes in the stoop like those things happen, like they just thinking about especially intergenerational connection last how you can have folks from multiple generations that ended up being on the students at the same time, whether they're talking to each other, or at each other, or, yeah, but how we can plan our butts off to try to get folks from multiple generations into the room and try to figure out how they're going to talk to each other and how it's all gonna work out. And somehow the student brings it all together, I really am thinking about my, my first summer in lawndale, as a student, we lived with the Smiley's and they lived downstairs. And they had two granddaughters who would come visit them and they would double dutch as you're saying it and they would try to tell our team of like, you know, like a super diverse team. That was like, predominantly Asian American had a couple of black folks on it. And one white person pretty sure, I think, yeah, just one. But like, we tried to get us to come out and do double dutch with them, you know, but me being like, I feel like my mom failed me because she never taught me how to double dutch as a bear and like, pretend like I knew that I was gonna do or like at least turn for them. But you'd have their their grandchildren, you'd have us who most of us are like, between the ages of 19 and 21. And then you have the Smiley's and then folks coming through and so it's like, the things that we will spend all this time planning for can happen on the street. Absolutely.

Tamice:

Absolutely. Yeah. It's just crazy. Like thinking about how, you know, all of these randoms are in one place. And usually like somebody whoever owns the home, like will bring out lemonade or like snacks and like feed them and just it's just so I'm just thinking about how not contrived it is and how it is really a staple you know, for for inner city. areas and thinking about like, I never looked at it as we have tried so hard to create things that can just happen like this naturally.

Jazzy:

It's interesting because I think I've ever talking about it to them, like, I'm thinking about space, and how space is controlled or spaces owned, right? And dominion over space and how like, you know, since my greatest context for this is Chicago, like, right? How many of the folks especially in that neighborhood of lawndale, like, you know, have been plundered and unable to own their own homes? Right, there's stories about it, right, like, that's what dynasty coats is talking about in the case of reparations. And, but there's this like, this reality of like, it's not like, who owns the home? Or who owns those streets, right. Like, there's something in the stoop that makes that question obsolete? Yes. Like, who owns this space? It, it takes that question away. Because it just becomes everyone's again, right. Until, you know, but the thing you do have to reckon with the like, the hard things of like, it's also the stoop where people can be evicted, right, and it will happen in that very place. And action from their stoops as people are being right. Something very tragic happens in the community, or there's violence, that's also happening is watched from the students and witnessed or taking place in the studio. And also there's just yes, those are also some things that are coming to mind. Like, the, the witness of the student, almost.

Tamice:

Yes, like, what has it seen? Right?

Barnabus:

Yeah, it is interesting, chatting, you know, you're talking about ownership of land, for the ways that in our modern day, we've, like, been structured to think about ownership. And remember, where I remember where I was, I remember talking to some, some friends, this is years ago, being like, you know, we teach children to share, then they're bad at it. But then we like wonder why? Because like, when do we ever have to share as adult people, everything is always about ownership, right? Like, I can lend this to you, but this is mine. But what you're talking about does make me think of like, the spaces that sit outside, right outside somebody's home, that they're their own or are renting are interesting spaces that are shared, that's very vulnerable, right? Like, people experience violence in these spaces, and invasion in these spaces, but also experienced these types of like, communion, where random people are drawn together. And I think about just how one of my professors talks about how he really is like, God is one of the most vulnerable beings and need, and in these places of vulnerability that you can't control, like, such sacred and that things happen, as well as such horrific things happen. Which is why then we create gates around our homes, double glass doors around so that you don't have this space that can like to protect yourself, because the world is a very violent place. But then you also lose all the opportunity for communion that the Spirit might be bringing about. Yes. Yeah.

Jazzy:

Oh, vulnerability is so real. Yes. Yeah. Thanks for naming that.

Tamice:

Yeah.

Barnabus:

Yeah, you don't have a gate up. You don't have Plexiglas around your studio? No, you really don't. The V authority that also can live within vulnerability. Um, mainly because I'm thinking of, I mean, obviously, I'm thinking about Jesus. But I'm also thinking about some of the matriarchs, who sit out there and can be incredibly vulnerable, even for just like their bodies, right to be outside all the time where there's a lot that's happening, but there's also an authority that they carry that exists also within the vulnerability of consistently exposing themselves as someone who is present in the community and who sees everything right. And but who's also there for everything, you know, so it's like vulnerable, but also a level of authority. That's really Powerful

Unknown:

Jesus,

Tamice:

when you guys are talking, I'm getting images and stuff in my head. And I was thinking about Amadou Dialo and how he was murdered on his suit. And how like even the movement that followed back in the late 90s, like, it started there. Like it started with people examining the bullet holes and the all of the, you know, the uproar and all of the things that happened as a result of that, like started in the same place as this, like, very, very violent, horrific death, like you had people. It was really interesting because of the way they treated his mother when she came and like her, the first place she wanted to go was to that same area, right? She'd never been there. But she wanted to go to the stoop and address the people from that place. And just thinking about how I'm still struck jazzy with the whole witness piece. And like, the fact that space, it's, it's, it's like, it's living, like everything around us is alive, you know, and bears witness.

Barnabus:

Jasmine are in a Bible study, we we just read through Genesis one through 11. Yesterday, and I was struck again, by Genesis four in the ground, the blood of Abel crying out from the ground. Is that there it like? The world is so alive, beyond what we know. Yeah. Yeah. You know,

Tamice:

and I was talking to, is it It wasn't Randy, I was I was sitting with like, some indigenous leaders. And they were talking about how within, like, evangelicalism there is, you know, relative amount of trending towards stewarding the earth and caring for creation and things like that. But what he said was, like, that's kind of like laughable because the earth is actually stewarding us, like, we don't take care of the earth, the Earth is taking care of us. And I really, I've been trying to think through that, that piece of like, what is it that in and of itself is his own vulnerability? It's like, I'm not even like the agent here. You know, like the earth, if it does not rain, if it does not, if the sun does not shine, like, there are ways in which like, even like, I don't even have control over my, really over my life and my being like, I'm vulnerable to this thing that can't even be grasped, right, like, who owns who owns the universe, like, who owns space? And what does that do for me, as I think about like, going and living and moving and having my being, knowing that, like, I am dependent upon this thing that is like, relatively abstract, right? Like, I can't, I can't grab it and go, this is how I want you to function. I'm just vulnerable to it. And I just been thinking, I was thinking a lot about that, as well.

Jazzy:

But nothing that we're ever taught is aimed at us understanding that to be true.

Unknown:

Right.

Jazzy:

You know, like I was saying earlier, like, it's everything, we're taught individualism, we're taught ownership, and, you know, like our formation and education is toward, you know, like, is toward creating a self sustaining life, right? And owning things, and then you go bigger, and you're like, oh, are like food systems, and the way that most of us understand agriculture is so disconnected from the land being something that is living the land provides for us, as you know, as just like, that is what we are taught, we were taught that the lands whole purpose is to keep us alive. And that's not theirs. It's not that there's no truth in that, right, like, but the way that we understand it, like, it's all unfolded in our, like, our right, to our rights, number one, right, it's all about our rights, our individual rights, rights of freedom, which is we saw yesterday in so many ways, right? But it's all about our rights, right? from the ground, and our rights to right, like, and so, you know, to come to the place that you're like naming nothing is nothing is teaching us that in our, in our, like, mainstream Western education. And so that we don't communicate with the earth in that way or the places that we live in as if they're alive. And that's very embedded in our theology, right? It's like, that's why it was so powerful for us to read back through Genesis. You know, I think the first time we were reading it, all of us were struck by how much like humans are, like, a part of creation. Right? Yes. Apart from, or just like it's like a part of. Yeah. But we I think the question I kept, I was asking my systematic theology Professor this past semester was like, yo, like, what if, you know, this is the story we have for creation, just because like, humans are the ones telling the story, right? But what happens when we like, Listen to the earth tell the story, they tell the earth tell us the story of creation differently. But of course, we're the stars because the we're the ones who are speaking the victors tell the story in a certain way, which is not like that conversation.

Unknown:

Shocking.

Jazzy:

The creation story, right? Yeah. I don't know. Yeah.

Unknown:

Wow.

Jazzy:

Unique in the relationship between humans and God and the way that humans are created. And I think that we tell the story to ourselves in a certain way, that's very much. By the way, we have decided we're going to interact with the earth, and absolutely, creatures. Absolutely. It also makes me think of like, I think I'm bibliodrama, which I love. Because one of the things that I love about bibliodrama is it helps us start to interact with Scripture in a different way. Right? So, so now, our, there are multiple interpretations of Scripture that we can engage with, right? That's a part of what a midrash practice is Ryan's medical interpretation. But now as we sit and we read, or like embody something like Genesis one or two, now we can hear what the rivers have to say to us. Yes, we actually can hear what the creatures have to say to us. Because our hearing, the white fire between the black fire of the words on the page of these things are alive, right, so that it's not a far reaching to think that the stoop is alive. Because if we were to interact with the story differently, the stoop has something to say to us. the communion table has something to say to us in the fields. Separate, right, like, and that's why I've been drawn to this practice of engaging with Scripture in a more embodied way. Yeah,

Tamice:

yeah. Yeah, I see. I was I was thinking about loneliness. I don't know why. But I was just thinking about my own experiences in the past year, and the levels of loneliness that I've been feeling. And when and when we had this conversation about how the earth cares for us. It really did actually save some of my loneliness, like walking outside or going for a walk with my daughter and realizing that the earth sees me like I'm seen and known that I'm not invisible and like, it's so hard to put into articulate but it just, it made me feel this like, like the interdependence and seeing why that's there's so much wisdom. In just recognizing and sort of just surrendering to the fact that like, this, this whole thing is supposed to be interdependent. It doesn't it doesn't work any other way. Um, I've just been, yeah, really touched by that. And like, talk, I talked to trees now. Have you? helped them? Yeah, I mean, I do. I think I like think clouds were raining now. We used to do stuff like that. And

Jazzy:

2020 and our isolation from one another. I felt the empathy of the empathy of creation.

Unknown:

Sure.

Jazzy:

I also found myself like when it rains being like, Oh, thank you. Yeah, I feel thank you for putting it out there.

Tamice:

I'm so pained because usually, like rain is a nuisance, right? You know, like, when it's raining outside, it, like makes everything that we have to do harder, and have to, like, put up an umbrella and I'm just seeing the juxtaposition of like, like, we don't even know what we need. Like we actually have disdain for rain, because it gets in the way of our grind. And actually, like, this is actually what's keeping us alive. and sustaining us. It's really hard to grapple with that. I'm wondering what you guys think like, what kind of damage can be done like if we're what what would be the consequence have, like continue. We continue to kind of believe in this sort of disembodied thing if we didn't think that the earth in the land that it speaks like what kind of damage does that produce in our in our life? Because the question I think, is like, why does it matter? Whether I think the clouds can talk? You know, I mean, like, I think there are people who would really ask question like, you know?

Unknown:

Yeah, I, I don't want to just repeat, I don't want to repeat, you know what I've been preaching recently.

Tamice:

Please do, I didn't hear it.

Jazzy:

I was pausing because I wanted you to preach it.

Barnabus:

I don't preach it now. You know, but. But the thing that I've been thinking about a lot is how cities are spaces that enforce human supremacy. Because the city is built by humans and for humans only, and everything else serves humans in the city. And so we don't have slaughterhouses in cities, and we have like graveyards at the edge of cities, we push everything else that we don't want to see far away. That doesn't serve us and are the ways that we think our lives should be, which is understandable from like an efficiency perspective. But what we do lose, I think, is what we always look, what we always lose with idolatry is you become less human or less sacred, you become disconnected from the reality of who we are as humans, which is very vulnerable, and very much sustained by a world that is woven together to be very interdependent. And what what you said, I think we lose one, intimacy and connection. And two, we lose the ability to rest. Because if humans are the only ones that are doing stuff that's important, then there's no ability to let go and rest on the reality that everything else around us, which city folks don't see, is constantly, you know, taking turns to like, do their part. And when you're working on the farm, or even just outside of the city, you're so much more aware that humans are very limited in how much that we can do. And there's such a deep invitation to learn how to be in relationship with the others that do the other things, and that we are all caring for each other, you know. So I think we just we lose intimacy, we lose the ability to rest, and we lose our own sense of being creatures. Then we become specie supremacists.

Tamice:

jazzy and brandy, we're talking about the Legion story yesterday on Instagram and that, like when you said yesterday? Yeah, I know. I feel like it's been like, it's just it's a lot, life is a lot. But they were talking about how Jesus came and like pretty much disrupted the economic system by freeing this man. And while they were talking, like I was in the, I don't know what you call that commenting, and thinking about how that's exactly what they did, like, they push that man to the outer skirts of their city, because they didn't want to see him. And my question was, like, I wonder how was he? Was that man always harassed by allegion? Or could some of that have been prohibited by community? Like if the community had embraced him, like, how much of his demonization happened because he was out pushed out and, and and left in a cave, you know? It's it just it I just, I think that the, the stories that I that I'm thinking about as you're talking about this, it's like, it makes me feel like scripture is alive. Because I would not have ever even thought of these passages in this way. Like I thought it had nothing to I was pretty much done. And like hearing these things, Jesse not talked about this too, like, like, the more that I am starting to, like sort of open up and progress. theologically the more I'm like, Oh my gosh, the scriptures are so like sacred, you know, um, it's just a beautiful thing like thinking about that and thinking about how Barney's talking about cities and the way that they're constructed? And immediately I'm thinking about oh yeah, the cigarette they tried to build and like what what Kane tried to build it's like, these things are kind of repeating themselves are these impulses are like repeating themselves. just crazy. I mean the whole Yeah, I'm like falling back in love with Scripture, which is nice. You know, it's nice. It's good to be back. Good to be home. You know. For those who are interested in hearing the full length version of this episode, please head over to our Patreon page and sign up to be a patron. Thank you so much for listening to the hive.